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© 2012 Pete Fyfe

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JOURNALIST
SINGER
MUSICIAN
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Last updated: 21st January 2015

It is with much sadness
that we have to advise
that Pete Fyfe passed
away  in 2015.
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Riverdance - part 1

 

A whole chapter of my career can be attributed to the phenomenon that was/is “Riverdance” so, with that in mind…

 

Can you remember where you were on Saturday 30th April 1994? A bit of a conundrum, rather like do you remember when John F Kennedy was assassinated? As it happens, the latter question is a little easier for me…it was Friday 22nd November 1963 but only because the 22nd November (1956 if you were wondering) is my birthday.

 

Back to the former question…the reason I ask about this date was that it will forever stand out as being fundamental in the acceptance of what Band Of Two performed (goodtime Irish/Celtic music) and possibly the single most influential date in Ireland’s birth as the Nation of ‘cool’!

Gaz and I were performing at The Mitre, Canterbury Road in Croydon (closed since 2005) and getting along fine with the amiable audience of locals when, for some reason everyone’s eyes were averted to the various TV screens dotted around the pub. Doing the decent thing, we stopped our song short (we had nearly finished it anyway) and joined everyone at the bar. Having forgotten that the Eurovision Song Contest was on we thought it surely couldn’t be that that was proving such a magnet…but, it was!

 

On screen, the legendary first televised performance of Riverdance (during Eurovision’s break) featuring Michael Flatley & Jean Butler was a jaw-dropping experience and when the finale with its awesome troupe of dancers brought everything to a close the whole pub erupted in applause…and this for a TV show. I have never seen emotions run this high before…even for a football match…and the feeling of euphoria from the locals could have created world peace such was the feel-good factor.

 

In a back-handed way it also meant that anything remotely Irish (including our music) was immediately accepted as part of a plan for the Celtic Tiger to take-over world domination and bring a smile to the most curmudgeonly of souls.

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